My Daily Reading List

I try not to follow the daily news cycle, which I find more distracting than informative. I also shy away from social media, so I don’t have a constant stream of click bait news headlines competing for my attention.

To keep up to date with current affairs I try follow websites that I find interesting using their RSS feeds. I have set up a server running a self hosted instance of FreshRSS to aggregate the feeds so I can read them from my office, home or phone. The list might look long, but each source isn’t updated on a daily basis so I find it somewhat manageable.

My current list of daily reads includes a mix of general international news, technology news, African focused articles, anarchist news and perspectives, and Stoic Philosophy:

General News

  • Comic Book Legal Defense Fund: “Comic Book Legal Defense Fund is a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting the First Amendment rights of the comics medium.”
  • Constitutionally Speaking: “This blog deals with political and social issues in South Africa, mostly from the perspective of Constitutional Law. Written by Pierre de Vos”
  • Conversation: Africa
  • Gates Notes: Updates from Bill Gates
  • Deeplinks: “EFF’s Deeplinks Blog: Noteworthy news from around the internet”
  • GroundUp: “News, analysis and opinion”
  • Intercept: “The Intercept is an award-winning news organization that covers national security, politics, civil liberties, the environment, international affairs, technology, criminal justice, the media, and more”
  • Media Lens: “News analysis and media criticism”
  • TorrentFreak: “Breaking File-sharing, Copyright and Privacy News”
  • Popehat: “A Group Complaint about Law, Liberty, and Leisure”

Specialty News and Commentary:

  • Anti-Fascist News: “Taking on Fascism and Racism from the Ground Up”
  • BDS South Africa: “Boycott – Divestment – Sanctions”
  • Carne Ross: “I am a former British diplomat who resigned over the Iraq war. I now run the world’s first non-profit diplomatic advisory group, Independent Diplomat”
  • CrimethInc: “CrimethInc. ex-Workers’ Collective: Your ticket to a world free of charge”
  • Freedom News: “Anarchist News and Views”
  • It’s Going Down: “Anarchist News and Counter-Information”
  • libcom.org: “News, archives and discussion on the class struggle. For human beings, not human resources”
  • Lucien van der Walt: “Articles, talks, books and texts: red/black and anarchist/ syndicalist/ left history, analysis, theory, struggles”
  • The Youth Rights Blog: “The online home of radical youth rights theory”
  • Unicorn Riot: “Your Alternative Media”
  • Zabalaza: News from the Zabalaza Anarchist Communist Front, “a specific anarchist political organisation based in Johannesburg, South Africa”

Stoic Philosophy

News Aggregation Websites:


This work by Clinton Pavlovic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Remembering Stephen Hawking

You will be missed.

“If machines produce everything we need, the outcome will depend on how things are distributed. Everyone can enjoy a life of luxurious leisure if the machine-produced wealth is shared, or most people can end up miserably poor if the machine-owners successfully lobby against wealth redistribution. So far, the trend seems to be toward the second option, with technology driving ever-increasing inequality.”

Professor Stephen Hawking, in response to a Reddit AMA


This work by Clinton Pavlovic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
The unedited featured photograph by Matt Nelson was published under a Creative Commons Zero Licence.

On Protest Action

An extract from the “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, an open letter written by Martin Luther King Junior in 1963:

“… In any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: collection of the facts to determine whether injustices exist; negotiation; self purification; and direct action. We have gone through all these steps in Birmingham.

… You may well ask: “Why direct action? Why sit ins, marches and so forth? Isn’t negotiation a better path?” You are quite right in calling for negotiation. Indeed, this is the very purpose of direct action. Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks so to dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored. My citing the creation of tension as part of the work of the nonviolent resister may sound rather shocking. But I must confess that I am not afraid of the word “tension.” I have earnestly opposed violent tension, but there is a type of constructive, nonviolent tension which is necessary for growth. Just as Socrates felt that it was necessary to create a tension in the mind so that individuals could rise from the bondage of myths and half truths to the unfettered realm of creative analysis and objective appraisal, so must we see the need for nonviolent gadflies to create the kind of tension in society that will help men rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood. The purpose of our direct action program is to create a situation so crisis packed that it will inevitably open the door to negotiation. I therefore concur with you in your call for negotiation. Too long has our beloved Southland been bogged down in a tragic effort to live in monologue rather than dialogue.

… First, I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to “order” than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: “I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action”; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a “more convenient season.” Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.

I had hoped that the white moderate would understand that law and order exist for the purpose of establishing justice and that when they fail in this purpose they become the dangerously structured dams that block the flow of social progress. I had hoped that the white moderate would understand that the present tension in the South is a necessary phase of the transition from an obnoxious negative peace, in which the Negro passively accepted his unjust plight, to a substantive and positive peace, in which all men will respect the dignity and worth of human personality. Actually, we who engage in nonviolent direct action are not the creators of tension. We merely bring to the surface the hidden tension that is already alive. We bring it out in the open, where it can be seen and dealt with. Like a boil that can never be cured so long as it is covered up but must be opened with all its ugliness to the natural medicines of air and light, injustice must be exposed, with all the tension its exposure creates, to the light of human conscience and the air of national opinion before it can be cured.

In your statement you assert that our actions, even though peaceful, must be condemned because they precipitate violence. But is this a logical assertion? Isn’t this like condemning a robbed man because his possession of money precipitated the evil act of robbery? … We must come to see that, as the federal courts have consistently affirmed, it is wrong to urge an individual to cease his efforts to gain his basic constitutional rights because the quest may precipitate violence. Society must protect the robbed and punish the robber. I had also hoped that the white moderate would reject the myth concerning time in relation to the struggle for freedom. …”


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Farewell to Facebook

I no longer have a Facebook account. I started my account in 2008, and gathered friends both old and new, but I found myself slowly neglecting the account more and more as time moved on.

I decided to finally close so my Facebook account so it doesn’t contribute to the database linkage accumulation slowdown “which is a major looming problem for web infrastructure and definitely not a thing I just made up”.


This work by Clinton Pavlovic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.